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Agent Life Canada December 2012 : Page 10

selling multigenerational travel trAvElS toGEthEr, StAyS toGEthEr By Erika Fifelski is working,” Paul says. Depending on the age group, children jump at the chance to participate in on-board activities like baking cookies in the ship kitchen or having pizza parties in the nightclub. It’s important to give families a place to make memories together too, and Jen Halboth of Globus Family of Brands says that the shift toward multigenerational travel is emerging in part to give families a way to spend their money and create experiences that last a lifetime. “Given the state of the economy over the last four to five years, in addition to the trend towards spending family time creating experiences (verses buying things), we’ve seen a strong increase in multigenerational bookings,” said Jen. “For some grandparents, travel is a way to give a gift and get time with their grandchildren (and children). And many parents are recognizing that they want to be the ones to introduce their children to travel versus waiting for them to discover it on their own as young adults.” Jen says European vacations are at the top of many multigenerational travelers’ bucket lists. In addition to being iconic, cities like Rome and Paris offer famous attractions while still being kid-friendly. “Grandparents want to be in the Colosseum with their grandchildren. Parents want a picture with their children at the Eiffel Tower. But then they want a little kid friendly spin, such as getting their picture taken with a Gladiator,” Jen says. The Family that Multigenerational travel is on the rise and beckons generations to explore lands and seas far and wide. This latest travel trend reflects families’ desire to make memories and spend time outside of the traditional annual holiday gathering. Whether on a cruise or an international excursion, grandparents, children, grandchildren, and sometimes great-grandchildren, are striking out to see the world together. And the travel industry is responding. Crystal Cruise Lines Director of Sales Paul Girouard notes they have seen an immense increase in multigenerational travel as of late. In the last three years, there have been many more than 10 one hundred families booking trips annually, he says. The summer season is the height of family travel, and Crystal Cruise Lines is responding by developing specialized programming that will keep travelers young and old engaged and entertained. “During days at sea, courtesy of our large team of children’s counselors, we run an age-separated activity program for the children that rivals the broad activities we offer for adults. As I like to say, we make the children nicely invisible, but keep them active and happy out of the path of the adult activities. We have had over one hundred children on some summer sailings, so clearly this www.nacta.com

selling

Erika Fifelski


The Family that TRAVELS TOGETHER, STAYS TOGETHER

Multigenerational travel is on the rise and beckons generations to explore lands and seas far and wide. This latest travel trend reflects families’ desire to make memories and spend time outside of the traditional annual holiday gathering. Whether on a cruise or an international excursion, grandparents, children, grandchildren, and sometimes great-grandchildren, are striking out to see the world together. And the travel industry is responding.

Crystal Cruise Lines Director of Sales Paul Girouard notes they have seen an immense increase in multigenerational travel as of late. In the last three years, there have been many more than one hundred families booking trips annually, he says. The summer season is the height of family travel, and Crystal Cruise Lines is responding by developing specialized programming that will keep travelers young and old engaged and entertained.

“During days at sea, courtesy of our large team of children’s counselors, we run an age-separated activity program for the children that rivals the broad activities we offer for adults. As I like to say, we make the children nicely invisible, but keep them active and happy out of the path of the adult activities. We have had over one hundred children on some summer sailings, so clearly this is working,” Paul says.

Depending on the age group, children jump at the chance to participate in onboard activities like baking cookies in the ship kitchen or having pizza parties in the nightclub.

It’s important to give families a place to make memories together too, and Jen Halboth of Globus Family of Brands says that the shift toward multigenerational travel is emerging in part to give families a way to spend their money and create experiences that last a lifetime.

“Given the state of the economy over the last four to five years, in addition to the trend towards spending family time creating experiences (verses buying things), we’ve seen a strong increase in multigenerational bookings,” said Jen. “For some grandparents, travel is a way to give a gift and get time with their grandchildren (and children). And many parents are recognizing that they want to be the ones to introduce their children to travel versus waiting for them to discover it on their own as young adults.”

Jen says European vacations are at the top of many multigenerational travelers’ bucket lists. In addition to being iconic, cities like Rome and Paris offer famous attractions while still being kid-friendly.

“Grandparents want to be in the Colosseum with their grandchildren. Parents want a picture with their children at the Eiffel Tower. But then they want a little kid friendly spin, such as getting their picture taken with a Gladiator,” Jen says.

Even those groups who don’t plan to travel far from home can find destinations that will appeal to many age groups. North American soft adventure tours like hiking and raft trips or jeep tours get families outside of their comfort zones giving them cause to bond even further during vacations.

“Sharing a travel experience with a family member enhances it in a way like nothing else can. A grandparent walking the beaches of Normandy with their grandchild or a mother taking in the Sistine Chapel with her child, it really is a once-in-a-lifetime experience.”

Selling multigenerational travel is simple, Paul says, especially if the group is looking to cruise. Quality time and exceptional experiences, not to mention convenience, are all grouped together in one cruise-ship package. On sea or land, family groups seek a trip in which the agent attends to the details so that families can focus on each other.

“Having someone else drive and handle all the logistics is the primary benefit that allows the family to really relax and enjoy their time together versus someone having to play driver, another person navigator, etc.”

Multigenerational travel has many “moving parts,” Jen says, so when booking a family together, be prepared with several destination and attraction options for multiple people–twelve to sixteen on average–and flight information from multiple cities. Keep websites updated with details for potential clients so they can rest easy knowing their trip will be coordinated. Give multigenerational groups a reason to book together.

“As with most groups, a consumer night or event really is a driver. Pulling together a selection of your database that could consider a multigenerational trip and inviting them in to experience firsthand from a supplier BDM, past traveler or the agent themselves, all they could see and do and how much stress it removes to consider a tour or package, will go a long way to plant the seed.”

Read the full article at http://digitaleditions.walsworthprintgroup.com/article/selling/1243360/137495/article.html.

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