Dermatology World September 2013 : Page 6

rounds news in brief Telehealth legislation gains momentum StAte neWS roUnDUP W ith the pool of insured patients set to grow tremen-dously while the dermatology workforce holds steady, dermatologists are increasingly looking to innovative new models of providing care. Telemedicine has the potential to expand dermatologic care in underserved areas, but for that to happen, dermatologists and their patients must suc-cessfully advocate for reimbursement for the services. A num-ber of bills have passed in 2013, bringing the idea of nationwide telemedicine services for dermatology patients closer to reality. • Arizona SB 1353, signed into law May 23 by Gov. Jan Brewer in a public ceremony, mandates that private insurers cover telemedicine services in rural areas of the state beginning in 2015. Montana’s SB 270, signed into law April 5, and New Mexico’s SB 69, signed April 2, provide similar mandates for patients in those states. • Colorado SB 180, signed into law June 5, provides recognition of telemedicine as a permitted method of delivering consulta-tive services for the practice of occupational therapy. • Illinois HB 2996 also allows for telemedicine delivery of care for occupational therapy. It has passed both chambers and has been sent to Gov. Pat Quinn. • Indiana’s legislature passed SB 554 to provide Medicaid coverage of telemedicine for rural centers, home health care, and community mental health centers. Gov. Daniels signed it into law. • Maryland’s SB 496, signed into law May 2, mandates coverage for telemedicine for both private insurers and Medicaid. Mis-sissippi’s SB 2209, signed into law April 1, provides a similar mandate. • In Missouri, advanced practice registered nurses are allowed to practice via telemedicine in rural areas after the passage of HB 936, signed into law July 8. • Nebraska’s LB 556 allows for Medicaid coverage of child behavioral services via live interactive telemedicine. • Oklahoma’s HB 2089, signed into law May 10, repeals informed consent for telemedicine, and HB 1235 allows the state’s Osteopathic Medical Board to issue telemedicine licenses. • Vermont’s H 272 and S 88, which have been signed into law, will focus on a pilot program that studies the effects of tele-medicine when delivered outside of a health care facility. new tanning laws on the way As dermatologists continue to spread the messages of skin cancer awareness and proper skin care, legislative activity continues to support bans for minors’ use of harmful tanning beds. • Connecticut SB 872 prohibits minors under 17 from indoor tanning. Gov. Daniel Malloy signed the bill into law on June 5, and it will go onto effect Oct. 1. • Nevada SB 267, which prohibits minors under 18 from tanning, went into effect July 1. • Oregon HB 2896, which prohibits tanning bed use by those under 18 without a physician’s prescription, was signed into law and will take effect on Jan. 1, 2014. • Texas SB 329, which includes a similar prohibition, became law without Gov. Rick Perry’s signature. The law takes effect on Sept. 1. -JOhn CarruThers 6 Dermatology WorlD // September 2013 www.aad.org/dw

rounds

John Carruthers

<br /> Telehealth legislation gains momentum<br /> <br /> STATE NEWS ROUNDUP<br /> <br /> With the pool of insured patients set to grow tremendously while the dermatology workforce holds steady, dermatologists are increasingly looking to innovative new models of providing care. Telemedicine has the potential to expand dermatologic care in underserved areas, but for that to happen, dermatologists and their patients must successfully advocate for reimbursement for the services. A number of bills have passed in 2013, bringing the idea of nationwide telemedicine services for dermatology patients closer to reality.<br /> • Arizona SB 1353, signed into law May 23 by Gov. Jan Brewer in a public ceremony, mandates that private insurers cover telemedicine services in rural areas of the state beginning in 2015. Montana’s SB 270, signed into law April 5, and New Mexico’s SB 69, signed April 2, provide similar mandates for patients in those states.<br /> • Colorado SB 180, signed into law June 5, provides recognition of telemedicine as a permitted method of delivering consultative services for the practice of occupational therapy.<br /> • Illinois HB 2996 also allows for telemedicine delivery of care for occupational therapy. It has passed both chambers and has been sent to Gov. Pat Quinn.<br /> • Indiana’s legislature passed SB 554 to provide Medicaid coverage of telemedicine for rural centers, home health care, and community mental health centers. Gov. Daniels signed it into law.<br /> • Maryland’s SB 496, signed into law May 2, mandates coverage for telemedicine for both private insurers and Medicaid. Mississippi’s SB 2209, signed into law April 1, provides a similar mandate.<br /> • In Missouri, advanced practice registered nurses are allowed to practice via telemedicine in rural areas after the passage of HB 936, signed into law July 8.<br /> • Nebraska’s LB 556 allows for Medicaid coverage of child behavioral services via live interactive telemedicine.<br /> • Oklahoma’s HB 2089, signed into law May 10, repeals informed consent for telemedicine, and HB 1235 allows the state’s Osteopathic Medical Board to issue telemedicine licenses.<br /> • Vermont’s H 272 and S 88, which have been signed into law, will focus on a pilot program that studies the effects of telemedicine when delivered outside of a health care facility.<br /> <br /> NEW TANNING LAWS ON THE WAY<br /> As dermatologists continue to spread the messages of skin cancer awareness and proper skin care, legislative activity continues to support bans for minors’ use of harmful tanning beds.<br /> • Connecticut SB 872 prohibits minors under 17 from indoor tanning. Gov. Daniel Malloy signed the bill into law on June 5, and it will go onto effect Oct. 1.<br /> • Nevada SB 267, which prohibits minors under 18 from tanning, went into effect July 1.<br /> • Oregon HB 2896, which prohibits tanning bed use by those under 18 without a physician’s prescription, was signed into law and will take effect on Jan. 1, 2014.<br /> • Texas SB 329, which includes a similar prohibition, became law without Gov. Rick Perry’s signature. The law takes effect on Sept. 1.

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