Ann Arbor Business Monthly March 2016 : Page 1

BUSINESS MONTHLY • ann arbor • chelsea • dexter • manchester • milan • saline • whitmore lake • ypsilanti ann arbor area Volume 12, No. 1 March 2016 $2.00 Access To And Cost Of Healthcare Continues to Improve By Duane Ramsey Washtenaw County continues to make strides in providing affordable mental and physical healthcare to more patients in its growing community, according to data collected and analyzed by local and national healthcare research organizations. Washtenaw County ranked in the top 20 of Michigan’s 82 counties in the categories of health factors and outcomes in 2015, according to the County Health Rankings and Roadmap, a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation program. Washtenaw County ranked fi rst in the overall ranking for health factors and ninth for health outcomes, according to the program’s data for 2015. The health outcomes for length and quality of life were determined by a number of factors that included health behaviors such as adult drinking, obesity, and smoking, along with physical environment, clinical care, socio and economic factors. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, based in Princeton, New Jersey, supports research and programs throughout the nation which are working to build a “culture of health.” As the largest U.S. philanthropy focused solely on health, it has INSIDE: Annual Commercial Of fi ce/Flex Vacancy Report By Swisher Commercial – Page 5 Are You My Lawyer? – Page 7 Local Job Market Promising For 2016 – Page 8 Small Business & The Internet By Mike Gould “Rocking the Internet” – Page 11 Business Briefs – Pages 12-15 Warde Manuel Named U-M Director of Intercollegiate Athletics –Page 16 Place Your Advertising Where Businesses Are Reading–– In the Pages of ann arbor area BUSINESS MONTHLY April Deadline is March 24 worked to improve the health and health care of all Americans for more than 40 years. “Overall, the state of health care coverage and access to care in Michigan is much improved. It appears our predictions that the ACA would lead to better coverage and access to care have been af fi rmed,” stated Marianne Udow-Phillips, director of the Center for Health Care Research & Transformation (CHRT known as “chart”) based at the University of Michigan. “The 2014 Cover Michigan Survey is the fi rst detailed look at changes that have occurred in Michigan since the implementation of the major coverage provisions under the Affordable Care Act went into effect,” stated Udow-Phillips. In 2014, fewer people in Michigan reported being uninsured and struggling to pay medical costs or delaying needed medical care. More residents had access to primary care than in 2012 before the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA) coverage expansions went into effect, according to a survey conducted by the CHRT. The survey, conducted in late 2014, asked 1,000 Michigan adults––including the uninsured and those with all types of insurance––about their experiences accessing primary and specialty care. The insured answered additional questions about their experience and satisfaction with their health insurance. In 2014, 21 percent of respondents said that cost was a major reason for not seeking needed medical care, half as many as in 2012. In addition, there was a 26 percent decrease in respondents who reported that they struggled to pay their medical bills. “The fact that we saw a 50 percent decrease in those reporting that they were uninsured compared to our survey Healthcare (Continued Page 3) ann arbor area BUSINESS MONTHLY P. O. Box 460 Hamburg, MI 48139-0460 PRSRT STD US POSTAGE PAID ST JOSEPH MI PERMIT #335

Access To And Cost Of Healthcare Continues to Improve

Duane Ramsey

Washtenaw County continues to make strides in providing affordable mental and physical healthcare to more patients in its growing community, according to data collected and analyzed by local and national healthcare research organizations.

Washtenaw County ranked in the top 20 of Michigan’s 82 counties in the categories of health factors and outcomes in 2015, according to the County Health Rankings and Roadmap, a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation program.

Washtenaw County ranked first in the overall ranking for health factors and ninth for health outcomes, according to the program’s data for 2015. The health outcomes for length and quality of life were determined by a number of factors that included health behaviors such as adult drinking, obesity, and smoking, along with physical environment, clinical care, socio and economic factors.

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, based in Princeton, New Jersey, supports research and programs throughout the nation which are working to build a “culture of health.” As the largest U.S. philanthropy focused solely on health, it has worked to improve the health and health care of all Americans for more than 40 years.

“Overall, the state of health care coverage and access to care in Michigan is much improved. It appears our predictions that the ACA would lead to better coverage and access to care have been affirmed,” stated Marianne Udow-Phillips, director of the Center for Health Care Research & Transformation (CHRT known as “chart”) based at the University of Michigan.

“The 2014 Cover Michigan Survey is the first detailed look at changes that have occurred in Michigan since the implementation of the major coverage provisions under the Affordable Care Act went into effect,” stated Udow-Phillips.

In 2014, fewer people in Michigan reported being uninsured and struggling to pay medical costs or delaying needed medical care. More residents had access to primary care than in 2012 before the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA) coverage expansions went into effect, according to a survey conducted by the CHRT.

The survey, conducted in late 2014, asked 1,000 Michigan adults––including the uninsured and those with all types of insurance––about their experiences accessing primary and specialty care. The insured answered additional questions about their experience and satisfaction with their health insurance.

In 2014, 21 percent of respondents said that cost was a major reason for not seeking needed medical care, half as many as in 2012. In addition, there was a 26 percent decrease in respondents who reported that they struggled to pay their medical bills.

“The fact that we saw a 50 percent decrease in those reporting that they were uninsured compared to our survey in 2012 is very significant and likely reflects both Michigan’s improved economy and the Affordable Care Act’s insurance expansion provisions,” Udow- Phillips concluded.

Before the coverage expansions occurred, there was concern that people would not be able to find care and turn to the emergency room for services.

CHRT’s team recently received the 2015 survey data, but has not analyzed that information yet. The coverage and access report for 2015 should be updated this spring, according to a CHRT spokesperson. Michigan’s health insurance marketplace launched its third annual open enrollment period on November 1, 2015, which ran through January 31. It allowed Michigan residents to shop for up to 64 health plans and to see if they would be eligible for financial assistance to decrease the cost of coverage for 2016.

The changing dynamics of the health insurance marketplace were important for 2015 enrollees. Under current federal policy, enrollees who do not actively apply and enroll in 2016 coverage were auto-renewed into their 2015 plan, if it continued to be offered.

Compared to the last open enrollment period, the Michigan marketplace has seen a moderate decrease in the number of available health plans and, in certain areas, considerable changes in premium costs for 2016. CHRT’s research showed that individuals selecting health coverage in Michigan are making their buying decision based on costs more than choice of physicians and network size.

The report, Health Plan Selection: Factors Influencing Michiganders’ Choice of Health Insurance, showed that consumers purchasing individual health insurance coverage were more than twice as likely to report that premium cost was very important in selecting a health plan as they were to report that the number of in-network physicians was a very important factor in their decision.

“We have known from consumer behavior that cost is very important, particularly where consumers are choosing and paying for health plans themselves. But, this study tells us more clearly just how much more important cost is in today’s marketplace than network size,” stated Udow-Phillips.

Health insurance auto renewals matter because benchmark plans (second lowest cost silver plans) changed in nearly every Michigan County from 2015 to 2016. Changes to benchmark plans directly affect premium tax credit amounts.

The CHRT is a non-profit partnership between U-M and Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan designed to promote evidencebased care delivery, improve population health, and expand access to care. Although much of the healthcare services in the county are provided by the two largest organizations, the St. Joseph Mercy Health System and University of Michigan Health System, an increasing number of patients are being served by other independent healthcare organizations in the area.

Integrated Health Associates, known as IHA, continues to expand in the Ann Arbor area in 2016. After opening a 44,200 square-foot patient clinic and urgent care center at Domino’s Farms in May of 2014, IHA broke ground last summer on its new 77,065 square-foot multispecialty medical center on Jackson Road just east of Zeeb Road.

With expected completion in the summer of 2016, the new West Arbor Medical Center will be home to family and internal medicine practices, OB/GYN, pediatric and other specialty practices. It will provide the work environment for more than 50 providers to see patients in 100 exam rooms. Additional support services will include urgent care, imaging, lab, physical therapy and a pharmacy.

IHA annually serves nearly 400,000 patients in Washtenaw, Livingston, Lenawee and western Wayne counties with 41 offices, about 300 physicians and total support staff of 1,100 people. It works with the St. Joseph Mercy Health System and UM Health System in Ann Arbor, Chelsea Community Hospital, and St. Joseph Mercy Livingston Hospital in Howell.

Ann Arbor Consultation Services, Inc. is an outpatient mental heath and substance abuse clinic that provides evidenced based services for patients at three locations in Ann Arbor and Brighton.

With more than 40 specialists, the clinic can find the right person to help each patient efficiently achieve their goals using the most effective techniques. In 2015, 75 percent of callers who chose to work with the organization were able to schedule an appointment when they called and were seen by a specialist within the time frame they requested, according to its website.

Ann Arbor Consultation Services accepts most Michigan insurance plans. Last year, 94 percent of its clients used their insurance or other company benefits and paid an average of a $20 co-pay per session, the firm reported.

The Eisenhower Center in Ann Arbor opened its doors in June of 1993 to provide postacute, residential rehabilitation services to individuals with traumatic brain injuries.

“We started out with one client in 1993 and have since grown to accommodate more than 150. Throughout our expansion, we have striven to stay true to the original intent of Dr. J. Stuart Phillips, our founder, who wanted to insure that as our clients progressed in their rehabilitation goals, we could continue to meet their needs, as stated on the company’s website.

In 2010, the Eisenhower Center expanded its campus model of rehabilitation to a new rural campus on a 62-ace farm. With multiple residential settings, recreational and vocational options, it offers an alternative to the bustle of a busy urban setting.

Expanding and developing new programs for its campus in Manchester will be the focus for future growth according to the organization.

The Corner Health Center in Ypsilanti saw a 30 percent increase in patient visits for mental health care last year. The center has been able to meet the growing need for mental health services by expanding its clinical team. It now has five clinical social workers that provide a range of therapy services to young people ages 12 through 25.

The center’s expanded team is providing services to support young adults who are experiencing anxiety, depression, stress, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), eating disorders and substance abuse, according to its website.

Afia Inc. a health IT consulting firm based in Ann Arbor, is working with community health centers, behavioral health organizations, physicians groups, primary care, public health, and other medical practices to implement IT systems and strategies to produce more efficient and effective healthcare organizations. Afia, a Swahili term meaning “health,” was started in 2007 by Chris Akerley and Jeremy Nelson, co-owners based on work they had performed at another organizations selecting and implementing multi county electronic health record (EHR) program. Akerley serves as president and Nelson as CEO. Both studied computer engineering at U-M and have utilized that technical background coupled with clinical knowledge and experience to provide an uncommon approach to HER selections and implementation.

M-14 Closure In Ann Arbor Set To Begin March 4

Starting at approximately 9 p.m. on Friday, March 4, M-14 will be closed between US-23 Business Route (Main Street) and the Miller Road/Maple Road interchange, with a detour posted. Through-access will not be available along this section of M-14 during the closure, which is expected to last through August. The posted detour will include US-23, I-94 and M-14.

The project includes concrete pavement patching between I-94 and the Huron River, resurfacing between the Huron River and the US-23/M-14 interchange, and bridge work at several locations, including over the Huron River, Bandermer Park and the railroad.

During construction, one lane of M-14 will be open between the US-23/M-14 interchange and Main Street, Access to Main Street and the Miller Road/Maple Road interchange will be maintained at all times.

Project information is available on the M-14 project website at www.michigan.gov/m14close. In addition, there is a toll-free number, 1-855-325-4856, established for the project that residents and motorists can call any time. The umber will be staffed during the week, during weekday hours. For 24/7 traffic information, go to MDOT’s Mi Drive website at www.michigan.gov/ drive.

Biosecurity Must Remain Top Priority On Every Michigan Farm

In recent years, diseases like high pathogenicity avian influenza in poultry and porcine epidemic diarrhea virus in swine have brought heightened awareness to farmers’ biosecurity practices.

Biosecurity is essentially a set of farm management practices working to prevent animals from coming in contact with germs which would cause them illness. While how the practices are implemented may vary from farm to farm, there are always the same key components:

• Keep Your Distance: It’s important to restrict animal access to people, wildlife and other domestic animals that could potentially be carrying disease. In addition, any time new animals are added to a farm, there should always be a period of time in which they are separated from other animals to ensure they are healthy before introducing them to the established animals.

• Keep It Clean: Washing your hands, clothes and footwear thoroughly before and after working with animals and regularly cleaning and disinfecting your equipment are essential to the prevent of disease on any farm.

• Don’t bring in disease. It’s important to think twice before sharing equipment or supplies with neighbors. If you decide to share equipment with others, always clean and disinfect equipment before and after sharing. It’s also important to disinfect boots, vehicle and other items after returning from another farm.

• Recognize a sick animal: Early detection of unhealthy animals can help prevent the spread of the disease among your animals and in your community. It is always wise to consult with your local licensed veterinarian.

MDARD asks farmers experiencing severe illness or multiple death losses in their animals to contact them at 800-292-3939 or for after hours emergencies call 517-373-0440.

Read the full article at http://digitaleditions.walsworthprintgroup.com/article/Access+To+And+Cost+Of+Healthcare+Continues+to+Improve/2415130/292645/article.html.

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