Georgia Bar Journal April 2011 : Page 22

member of the faculty at Mercer University School of Law. He is a member of the American Society of International Law and has pub-lished articles in the American Journal of International Law . Moreover, Georgia is home to the world’s busiest airport, Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport as well as two deep-water ports, and it boasts extensive con-ference and convention room space, including the Georgia World Congress Center. Further, it is much less expensive to conduct an international arbitration proceed-ing in Georgia than in traditional international arbitration sites, such as New York City, Washington, D.C., London or Paris. No longer is arbitration only a domestic alternative to litigation in the courts; international arbitration has become integral to the opera-tion of our global economy, and its importance will continue to accel-erate. The impact of the skyrocket-ing growth in international arbitra-tion is being felt here in Georgia as Georgia-based and foreign com-panies alike have taken notice of the benefits of international arbitra-tion. Diligent and forward-think-ing practitioners in Georgia new to international arbitration would be wise to take this cue by staying aware of the latest developments in this burgeoning field. Daniel J. King is a retired partner in King & Spalding’s Business Litigation Practice Group and International Arbitration Practice. King served as the leader of the firm’s Business Litigation Practice Group from 2003-08. He also is former chairman of King & Spalding’s Training Committee. He has significant litigation and trial experience in a wide range of com-mercial litigation and international arbitration matters. King is includ-ed in the International Who’s Who 22 of Commercial Litigators , and he is listed in the Best Lawyers in America as well as being recog-nized as a Georgia “Super Lawyer.” Brian A. White is a partner in King & Spalding’s Business Litigation Practice Group and International Arbitration Practice. White has represented clients in arbitration disputes under the rules of the London Court of International Arbitration, the International Chamber of Commerce, the International Arbitral Centre of the Austrian Federal Chamber, the World Intellectual Property Organization, the AIDA Reinsurance and Insurance Arbitration Society (U.K.), the Santiago Arbitration and Mediation Center, the American Arbitration Association’s International Centre for Dispute Resolution, the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law and the International Centre for the Settlement of Investment Disputes. He currently represents clients from North and South America, Europe, the Middle East and Australia in a variety of international arbitra-tions. White also has litigated cases in state and federal courts throughout the United States. Ryan J. Szczepanik is an associate in King & Spalding’s Business Litigation Practice Group and International Arbitration Practice. Szczepanik has represented clients in arbitration disputes under the rules of the International Chamber of Commerce, the International Arbitral Centre of the Austrian Federal Chamber, the Santiago Arbitration and Mediation Center and the American Arbitration Association’s International Centre for Dispute Resolution. He also has represented clients in commercial litigation matters in various federal and state courts. 1. Georgia USA, http://www. georgia.org/BusinessInGeorgia/ InternationalBusiness/Pages/ default.aspx (last visited Feb. 17, 2011). 2. Georgia USA, http://www. georgia.org/BusinessInGeorgia/ InternationalBusiness/Pages/ AboutUs.aspx (last visited Feb. 17, 2011). 3. Compare Hong Kong Int’l Arbitration Centre, About the HKIAC, http://www.hkiac.org/ show_content.php?article_id=307 (last visited Feb. 22, 2011) to id. , http://www.hkiac.org/show_ content.php?article_id=310 (last visited Feb. 22, 2011). 4. United Nations Treaty Collection, http://treaties.un.org/ doc/Publication/MTDSG/ Volume%20II/Chapter%20XXII/ XXII-1.en.pdf (last visited Feb. 17, 2011). 5. William H. Knull & Noah D. Rubins, Betting the Farm on International Arbitration: Is It Time to Offer an Appeal Option? , 11 A m . R ev . I nt ’ l A Rb . 531, 539 (2000) (“International arbitration awards, if properly rendered, are far easier to enforce in foreign jurisdictions than court judgments.”). 6. See, e.g. , Int’l Chamber of Commerce, Rules of Arbitration, art. 8 (Jan. 1, 1998) [hereinafter ICC Rules], available at http://www. iccwbo.org/uploadedFiles/Court/ Arbitration/other/rules_arb_ english.pdf (last visited Feb. 22, 2011). 7. Scherk v. Alberto-Culver Co., 417 U.S. 506, 515 (1974). 8. Lipcon v. Underwriters at Lloyd’s, London, 148 F.3d 1285, 1293-94 (11th Cir. 1998) (quoting Scherk , 417 U.S. at 515). 9. Lindsay Biesterfeld, Parties to International Commercial Arbitration Agreements Beware: Bankruptcy Trumps Supreme Court Precedent Favoring Arbitration of International Disputes , 2006 J. D Isp . R esol . 273, 273 (2006) (citing Mitsubishi Motors Corp. v. Soler Chrysler-Plymouth, Inc., 473 U.S. 614 (1985)). 10. O.C.G.A. §§ 9-9-1 to 9-9-43 (2007). Georgia Bar Journal Endnotes Conclusion

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